centerpieces
Every Eleven Seconds
Created by Robert Farber
 

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In 1991, the late Robert Farber (1948-1995) created Every Ten Minutes a sound piece for the third annual Day Without Art, the art world's day of action and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis. For the In Memoriam issue of Artery, the piece has been "updated." In 1999, an AIDS-related death every ten minutes in the United States, is now an AIDS-related death every 11.3 seconds, somewhere on the planet.

Copyright The Estate of Robert Farber


Courtesy the Robert D. Farber Foundation
Robert Storr, a curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York described the Projects Room-exhibition of Farber's work at the museum, as follows:

"The only genuine work of art in the room was Robert Farber's. Disembodied but deeply resonant, it consisted of the subdued ringing of a bell. The piece, Every Ten Minutes, sounded at the interval cited in the title. Situated near the Modern's ground floor entrance, the Projects Room, with its barren display, acted as an echo chamber, broadcasting the single, faint, intermittent musical note throughout the Museum s central hall. Amidst the bustle of the lobby crowds its testimony was arresting and eloquent.

We in the Projects Program were not the only ones to make use of Robert's haunting piece. So, too, did The Whitney Museum of American Art, The New Museum of Contemporary Art, and private galleries around the city, including those of such respected dealers as Leo Castelli and Marian Goodman. In each location the same simple but profound imaginative event occurred: sound became memory and thought; as these memories and thoughts multiplied, they linked together the diverse population that heard the ringing and transformed them into a collective mind focused, in the silence bracketed by each muted clang, on AIDS and all that the disease has come to mean in this country and around the world."


Artery appreciates the Estate of Robert Farber's permission to- and cooperation in- altering and re-presenting the work.

Robert Farber's work may be seen in The Virtual Collection